Making a Lap Loom

OK, so first of all, what is a lap loom in the most basic sense? It's literally just a rectangular frame where you can tie warp strings on to! So don't feel like you need a fancy expensive loom, especially if you're just starting out. (The one advantage of those fancy looms is that they often come with a heddle bar which can help pass your weft threads through faster, but don't worry about that just yet.)

There are a few resourceful ways that you can put together a quick, inexpensive loom:

1. Go to your local thrift store and find the cheapest art you can find that is mounted on a sturdy wooden frame and is the size you desire. Strip the art off, and use some finishing nails to nail in. (See below to 3a. to see what nails I use.)

2. Go to an art store and buy stretcher bars that you can put together and use as the frame. 

3. Have some tools and wood laying around? Make one yourself!

 a. Here are the supplies you will need:  Wood. (I recommend pine. Other harder woods will be difficult to nail through, as I learned the hard way...)  Something to cut the wood. I have a  Black and Decker jigsaw  which I love and use surprisingly often.  Some screws that will screw through 2 pieces of the wood that you got.   1" finishing nails  A drill, hammer, ruler, pencil and sand paper block.

a. Here are the supplies you will need:

Wood. (I recommend pine. Other harder woods will be difficult to nail through, as I learned the hard way...)

Something to cut the wood. I have a Black and Decker jigsaw which I love and use surprisingly often.

Some screws that will screw through 2 pieces of the wood that you got. 

1" finishing nails

A drill, hammer, ruler, pencil and sand paper block.

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 b. Figure out how big you want your loom to be. I always suggest drawing a diagram. Cut 3 same length horizontal bars, and 2 same length vertical bars. The extra horizontal bar will be a lap rest that you will nail across the back of your loom. 

b. Figure out how big you want your loom to be. I always suggest drawing a diagram. Cut 3 same length horizontal bars, and 2 same length vertical bars. The extra horizontal bar will be a lap rest that you will nail across the back of your loom. 

 c. Use the sand paper block to sand off the raw edges of your bars. 

c. Use the sand paper block to sand off the raw edges of your bars. 

 d. Time to put your bars together. Place your vertical bars down first. Your horizontal bars should lay on top of the vertical bars. After you finish this, you'll turn your frame over and screw in your lap bar somewhere in the middle. This lap bar will allow the loom to rest on your lap more easily.

d. Time to put your bars together. Place your vertical bars down first. Your horizontal bars should lay on top of the vertical bars. After you finish this, you'll turn your frame over and screw in your lap bar somewhere in the middle. This lap bar will allow the loom to rest on your lap more easily.

 e. When you screw your screws in in each corner of the frame, I recommend drilling in a pilot hole, especially if your screws are thick or the wood is harder. Also, most importantly, you're going to screw in TWO screws in each corner, otherwise your frame will not be sturdy.

e. When you screw your screws in in each corner of the frame, I recommend drilling in a pilot hole, especially if your screws are thick or the wood is harder. Also, most importantly, you're going to screw in TWO screws in each corner, otherwise your frame will not be sturdy.

 f. Now mark where you will nail in your nails. I like to do my nails 1/2" apart but you can do slightly closer together if you want, especially if you are using thinner yarns.

f. Now mark where you will nail in your nails. I like to do my nails 1/2" apart but you can do slightly closer together if you want, especially if you are using thinner yarns.

 g. Then hammer away! Be sure to use finishing nails so that the weaving will be relatively easy to take off the loom when you're finished. 

g. Then hammer away! Be sure to use finishing nails so that the weaving will be relatively easy to take off the loom when you're finished. 

 Ta-da!! It's not the prettiest thing but it'll definitely do the damn job. Get yerself some cotton twine. I got mine at  Uline  but you could prob find a smaller spool on Amazon or somewhere else on the internet.

Ta-da!! It's not the prettiest thing but it'll definitely do the damn job. Get yerself some cotton twine. I got mine at Uline but you could prob find a smaller spool on Amazon or somewhere else on the internet.

 What now? I don't know, Youtube it!! :-P I'll make a post soon about how to actually warp the threads but if you want to get started right away, there are a ton of tutorials on the tube for tying on your warp threads. It's kind of confusing to describe in writing, but basically you use a square knot loop to begin and end it. Don't forget to msg/tag me if you make one of these guys! Feel free to msg me via IG @bzrshop if you have any questions or issues, I'll do my best to help you along the way. Good luck!  Thanks to awesome chick Kailee for the photos!!  Check out here.   <3 Tiffany

What now? I don't know, Youtube it!! :-P I'll make a post soon about how to actually warp the threads but if you want to get started right away, there are a ton of tutorials on the tube for tying on your warp threads. It's kind of confusing to describe in writing, but basically you use a square knot loop to begin and end it. Don't forget to msg/tag me if you make one of these guys! Feel free to msg me via IG @bzrshop if you have any questions or issues, I'll do my best to help you along the way. Good luck!

Thanks to awesome chick Kailee for the photos!! Check out here.

<3 Tiffany

Tiffany JuComment